A lesson in hipster poetry – Review

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milkI once heard someone describe this book as ‘hipster’ poetry, and I can see why. It discusses a lot of mainstream issues: love, relationships, sex and feminism, but from the author’s personal, sometimes dark experiences. Milk and Honey was written by young Canadian author Rupi Kaur and has been incredibly popular in the book world lately. Kaur, you might recall, is the young woman responsible for the photo essay that explored menstruation taboos. When she shared one of the photos on Instagram, it was deleted, proving the exact point that Kaur was trying to make: “A majority of people, societies, and communities shun this natural process. Some are more comfortable with the pornification of women, the sexualization of women, the violence and degradation of women than this. They cannot be bothered to express their disgust about all that, but will be angered and bothered by this” (Kaur, Instagram post, March 24, 2015).

I fully support what Rupi Kaur stands for and what she’s trying to do with her work, and I think Milk and Honey is very relevant to today’s society for the exact reasons Kaur mentioned above. But is it good poetry?

Since I’m not very familiar with how to analyze or review poetry, I sought out the help of my best friend, Tess Lund, who has a double major in English and Writing. She gave me a little lesson in poetry and after a quick flip through and analysis of the first few poems, she informed me that no, Milk and Honey in her educated opinion, is not the amazing piece of poetic literature everyone seems to think it is. After hearing her reasoning, I have to say I agree.

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Rainbow Bookshelf: Before and After 

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I’ve seen the rainbow bookshelf trend around online quite a bit and thought for today’s post I’d do something relaxing and try it out. I think it turned out okay – yes, the “Fiction” book end is supposed to go on the other side – but it was needed more on the left. Overall though, it definitely looks neater, and more aesthetically pleasing. Any of you book nerds out there ever done the rainbow bookcase?

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Welcome to The Dallow Way!

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It’s official! I just changed The Vista Review to The Dallow Way – a play on Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf, which I read two years ago and quite enjoyed. I’ll need to re-read it and do a review on here sometime.

Like Mrs. Dalloway, The Dallow Way will be full of introspection, streams of consciousness about my internal and external thoughts and experiences, focusing on books, writing, creativity, art, mixed media, and whatever else comes along. I hope you’ll join me!

www.thedallowway.wordpress.com 

What’s this? A new blog you say?

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For the past few days, I’ve been toying with the idea of converting this blog from a pop culture review blog into a general lifestyle blog that still includes book reviews and the like. Something happened at work today that I thought was the perfect thing to start off the new direction for this blog.  Continue reading

2017 Canada Reads: The results are in – and they don’t make sense

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canreads.jpgI mentioned in my review of The Break that it was a finalist for the Canada Reads discussion, which just happened two weeks ago. The panel consisted of Candy Palmater defending The Break, Humble the Poet defending Fifteen Dogs, Chantal Kreviazuk defending The Right to be Cold, Measha Brueggergosman defending Company Town, and Jody Mitic defending Nostalgia.

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This book might break you – A Review

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breakThe Break by Katherena Vermette has been quite popular in the world of books lately. A national bestseller, The Break has received an abundance of literary attention, from being a 2016 Governor General’s Literary Finalist to a 2017 Canada Reads Finalist, and much more in between.

The story centres around an extended family of Indigenous women living in Winnipeg’s North End. The synopsis on the back is as follows: “When Stella, a young Métis mother, looks out her window one evening and spots someone in trouble on the Break — a barren field on an isolated strip of land outside her house — she calls the police to alert them to a possible crime.” From there, The Break delves into several narratives of family, friends, and police, each connected in some way to the crime. Continue reading

Learning how to swim in the pool we call life – A Review

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swimThis book was a staff pick of the month at the bookstore I work at, and wanting to be more well read and up to date on the latest book buzz, I decided to pick it up – but not just because it was staff pick of the month; I had read the synopsis and it actually sounded quite intriguing. Swimming Lessons by Claire Fuller is about a young woman named Flora who returns to her home to look after her father, Gil, after he has a bad fall. Twelve years previously, Flora’s mother, Ingrid, disappeared without a trace and Flora has always wondered what happened to her. Little does she realize, the answers to her questions are buried in the letters Ingrid wrote to her husband Gil. They reveal the truth of their marriage and just before she disappeared, Ingrid hid them in the massive book collection Gil accumulated over the years in the house they shared. Continue reading

In a (very not so) dark, dark wood – Review

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in-a-dark-dark-wood-9781501112331_hrI found this book whilst re-shelving books at my place of work and was immediately intrigued by the premise – Leonora, our protagonist, attends a cozy, bachelorette party for her ex-best friend Clare, but the weekend takes a dark turn when two days later Leonora wakes up in the hospital with the knowledge that someone is dead, and she can’t be sure she’s not responsible. The events of the weekend are foggy and in order to find out what has happened, Leonora must “re-visit parts of herself that she would much rather leave buried where they belong: in the past.” The book was written by UK author Ruth Ware in 2015, and because of her latest novel, The Woman in Cabin 10, which was being promoted throughout my workplace, I thought I would read her debut novel In a Dark, Dark Wood and then move on to The Woman in Cabin 10, especially since I thought the premise of Dark Wood actually sounded more intriguing than Cabin 10.

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The De-lovely Bones – A Review

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The_Lovely_Bones_book_cover.jpgThe Lovely Bones was written by Alice Sebold in 2002 and turned into a feature film in 2009. I’ve never seen the movie but thought if I did want to see it, I’d prefer to read the book first. The Lovely Bones was hard to read in places simply because of the book’s emotional content, and though I enjoyed the writing style and story telling, I have to say overall I wasn’t overly impressed with it, especially the ending.

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Flying the nest, sort of – A Review

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image7Released March 22 of last year, The Nest by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney was incredibly hyped up throughout 2016 with myriads of praise and best seller distinctions, also being named Book of the Year by Harper Collins. Working in a bookstore made this debut novel hard to ignore and once again like The Couple Next Door, I just had to read it and see what I was missing, if anything. Continue reading