Learning how to swim in the pool we call life – A Review

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swimThis book was a staff pick of the month at the bookstore I work at, and wanting to be more well read and up to date on the latest book buzz, I decided to pick it up – but not just because it was staff pick of the month; I had read the synopsis and it actually sounded quite intriguing. Swimming Lessons by Claire Fuller is about a young woman named Flora who returns to her home to look after her father, Gil, after he has a bad fall. Twelve years previously, Flora’s mother, Ingrid, disappeared without a trace and Flora has always wondered what happened to her. Little does she realize, the answers to her questions are buried in the letters Ingrid wrote to her husband Gil. They reveal the truth of their marriage and just before she disappeared, Ingrid hid them in the massive book collection Gil accumulated over the years in the house they shared. Continue reading

In a (very not so) dark, dark wood – Review

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in-a-dark-dark-wood-9781501112331_hrI found this book whilst re-shelving books at my place of work and was immediately intrigued by the premise – Leonora, our protagonist, attends a cozy, bachelorette party for her ex-best friend Clare, but the weekend takes a dark turn when two days later Leonora wakes up in the hospital with the knowledge that someone is dead, and she can’t be sure she’s not responsible. The events of the weekend are foggy and in order to find out what has happened, Leonora must “re-visit parts of herself that she would much rather leave buried where they belong: in the past.” The book was written by UK author Ruth Ware in 2015, and because of her latest novel, The Woman in Cabin 10, which was being promoted throughout my workplace, I thought I would read her debut novel In a Dark, Dark Wood and then move on to The Woman in Cabin 10, especially since I thought the premise of Dark Wood actually sounded more intriguing than Cabin 10.

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The De-lovely Bones – A Review

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The_Lovely_Bones_book_cover.jpgThe Lovely Bones was written by Alice Sebold in 2002 and turned into a feature film in 2009. I’ve never seen the movie but thought if I did want to see it, I’d prefer to read the book first. The Lovely Bones was hard to read in places simply because of the book’s emotional content, and though I enjoyed the writing style and story telling, I have to say overall I wasn’t overly impressed with it, especially the ending.

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Flying the nest, sort of – A Review

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image7Released March 22 of last year, The Nest by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney was incredibly hyped up throughout 2016 with myriads of praise and best seller distinctions, also being named Book of the Year by Harper Collins. Working in a bookstore made this debut novel hard to ignore and once again like The Couple Next Door, I just had to read it and see what I was missing, if anything. Continue reading

Another day of sun for the city of stars – A Review

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lalalnd.jpgThere has been a lot of hype around the release of this film and its popularity certainly shows in local theatres. Last week when I went to see it, I was told to pre-order my tickets online because the show times were selling out so fast that you were almost guaranteed to not get a ticket if you came the night of – or at least, you wouldn’t get good seats.

After seeing the film though, I understand completely why it’s been so popular. Continue reading

Adding ‘The Perfume Collector’ to my collection – A Review

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pcMy mom gave me this book to read, knowing I have an interest in all things vintage and anything to do with mysteries and secrets from the past. The Perfume Collector by Kathleen Tessaro has all of these things and more.

The story centres on newlywed Grace Munroe in 1955 London, England when she receives a letter saying she is the recipient of a large inheritance from the recently deceased Eva d’Orsey in Paris, France. The only problem is, Grace does not know Eva d’Orsey and has never heard of her before. Grace embarks on a journey to discover who this woman is and why Grace is the sole recipient of her will. Along the way she also discovers what it means to be true to herself versus what is expected of her in society. Continue reading

The Couple Nixed Door – A Review

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couple-next-door-final_I’ve heard about this one on the radio a few times and constantly see it at the book store where I work, staring at me from the bestsellers shelf. Finally, I picked it up to see what all the hype was about, and I can kind of see why it’s been popular, but it also has many flaws.

The Couple Next Door by Shari Lapena is a mystery thriller about a baby who goes missing from her house while her parents visit next door at the neighbours. The parents, Marco and Anne, take turns every half hour checking on the baby, but when Anne checks on her at 1 am, she discovers her child is gone.

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Jessica Jones: Finally, men and women portrayed as people – A Review

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jessica_jones_final_posterI’m probably a little late to the game in reviewing this TV show, but I just finished watching the first season of Jessica Jones – and I loved it. Everything from the theme song and opening credits to the dialogue, the acting, the characters and the intricate story line – Jessica Jones has it all, but what’s most notable about it is its revolutionary portrayal of women and men in pop culture. Continue reading

The (Drunk) Girl on the Train – A Review

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original_The_Girl_on_the_Train.jpgI picked up The Girl on the Train the other month because I’d been hearing so much about it and seeing it around everywhere – plus the movie came out – and my curiosity as to what made this book so damn popular was piqued to the point where I just had to find out. I’d also heard, “If you liked Gone Girl then you’ll love this book too!” And I’d read Gone Girl and mostly enjoyed it, so I thought I’d give The Girl on the Train a try.

I cared so little for it that I didn’t even finish it.

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Never judge a person by their book

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download-1The war between literary fiction and genre fiction is something I became aware of about two years ago when I joined Booktube: a community of people on YouTube who make videos about everything to do with books. From what I’ve garnered about the situation, it appears genre is ‘the bad guy’ or ‘the fun dumb one,’ and literary is ‘the good guy’ or ‘the boring smart one,’ and to be associated with one or the other apparently says a lot about what kind of person you are. Continue reading